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These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


March 8

The Awakening, cartoon by Henry Mayer

This is a cartoon by the German-American cartoonist and animator Henry Mayer (1868–1954), entitled The Awakening, which first appeared in the magazine Puck in February 1915. Published in support of women's suffrage in the United States, the cartoon depicts Lady Liberty wearing a cape labeled "Votes for Women" and standing astride the states (colored white) that had granted women the right to vote. A poem by Alice Duer Miller is printed beneath.

Cartoon credit: Henry Mayer; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 7

Mieke Wijaya

Mieke Wijaya (born 7 March 1940) is an Indonesian actress who has won three Citra Awards. Photographed here around 1960, she rose to fame as one of the stars in Perfini's musical comedy film Tiga Dara. Her career, spanning five decades, included performing as part of a stage-drama troupe in the 1960s while continuing to act in films, but she mostly concentrated on television roles by the 1990s.

Photograph credit: Tati Photo Studio; restored by Chris Woodrich


March 6

Palais Galliera

The Palais Galliera, formally known as the Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris, is a museum of fashion and fashion history located in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, France. Following the death of her husband in 1876, the Duchess of Galliera gave land and funds for the erection of a museum to house his collection of paintings and fine art that she proposed to give to the state. The building was completed in 1894, but the collections were in fact donated to Genoa, Italy, where they are now displayed at the Palazzo Rosso and the Palazzo Bianco.

Photograph credit: Joe deSousa


March 5

Lansdowne Heracles

The Lansdowne Heracles is a Roman marble sculpture dating from about 125 CE. It represents the hero Heracles as a beardless youth grasping the skin of the Nemean lion with his club upon his shoulder. The statue was discovered in 1790 on the site of Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli, and is now in the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum's Getty Villa in Malibu, California.

Sculpture credit: unknown; photographed by the J. Paul Getty Museum


March 4

Coat of arms of Vermont

This historical depiction of the coat of arms of Vermont was illustrated by American engraver Henry Mitchell in State Arms of the Union, published in 1876 by Louis Prang. The escutcheon depicts a green landscape, beyond which are high mountains and a yellowish sky; in the center grows a pine tree, between three erect yellow sheaves and a red cow. The state's official motto, "Freedom and Unity", appears below the shield.

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva

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March 3

Female hardhead
Male hardhead

The hardhead (Aythya australis) is a species of diving duck found in Australia. Also known as the white-eyed duck, its plumage is chocolate brown in both sexes, but only males have the distinctive white eye. The common name "hardhead" has nothing to do with the density of the bird's skull, instead referring to the difficulty encountered by early taxidermists in processing the head. These female (top) and male (bottom) hardheads were photographed at Hurstville Golf Course in Mortdale, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison

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March 2

Les Troyens

Les Troyens (The Trojans) is a French grand opera in five acts by Hector Berlioz, with a libretto written by the composer himself based on Virgil's Aeneid. The score was composed between 1856 and 1858, but Berlioz did not live long enough to see the work performed in its entirety. The first two acts were performed separately under the title La Prise de Troie. This picture shows the cover of the first-edition vocal score for La Prise de Troie, published in 1863.

Illustration credit: Antoine Barbizet; restored by Adam Cuerden

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March 1

Pula Arena

This is a panoramic view of the interior of the Pula Arena, a Roman amphitheatre in Pula, Croatia. Constructed between 27 BC and AD 86, it is among the six largest surviving Roman arenas in the world, and is the best-preserved ancient monument in the country. The amphitheatre appears on the Croatian ten-kuna banknote.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


February 28

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey is an Anglican parish church and Grade I listed building in the English city of Bath, Somerset. This photograph shows the interior of the church, featuring the stained glass and the altar at the eastern end of the nave. The square-framed window of seven lights includes a depiction of the Nativity and was made by Clayton and Bell in 1872. The fan vaulting on the ceiling provides structural stability by distributing the weight of the roof down ribs that transfer the force into the supporting columns via flying buttresses.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


February 27

A Negress

A Negress is an 1884 oil-on-canvas painting by the Polish artist Anna Bilińska-Bohdanowicz, depicting an unknown model. The subject is portrayed from the waist up and dressed in a white robe, but is part naked, with one breast exposed. The Japanese hand fan and the source of light that illuminates the figure and is reflected by highlights in the gold bijoux, create a warm and chamber-like atmosphere. Painted in Paris, the painting was looted during World War II. It was returned to the collection of the National Museum in Warsaw in 2012.

Painting credit: Anna Bilińska-Bohdanowicz


February 26

Malagasy giant chameleon

The Malagasy giant chameleon (Furcifer oustaleti) is a large species of chameleon, endemic to Madagascar. As well as the insects and small vertebrates on which the species feeds, it sometimes consumes fruit. It has been observed drawing fruit-bearing twigs closer with its forelimbs, a degree of food manipulation unusual in reptiles. This juvenile Malagasy giant chameleon was photographed at night in Montagne d'Ambre National Park.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


February 25

Donner Pass

Donner Pass is a 7,056-foot-high (2,151 m) mountain pass in California in the northern Sierra Nevada. This panoramic photograph shows the view from the pass towards the east, with Donner Lake visible in the distance. The pass has been used by the California Trail, the first transcontinental railroad, the Overland Route, the Lincoln Highway and the Victory Highway (both later U.S. Route 40), as well as indirectly by Interstate 80. The pass got its name from the Donner Party, many of whom died here during the winter of 1846–47.

Photograph credit: Frank Schulenburg


February 24

The Bathers

The Bathers is an oil-on-canvas painting by the French artist Paul Cézanne, first exhibited in 1906. The painting is the largest of a series of paintings of bathers by the artist, and is considered a masterpiece of modern art. He worked on the painting for seven years, and it remained unfinished at the time of his death. Often considered Cézanne's finest work, it is in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Painting credit: Paul Cézanne


February 23

Phenakistiscope

The phenakistiscope was the first widespread animation device that created a fluent illusion of motion. A series of pictures showing sequential phases of the animation are seen through small slots spaced evenly around the rim of a disc. The user would spin the disc and look through the moving slits at the images reflected in a mirror, seeing a rapid succession of images that appear to be a single moving picture. This animation shows one such phenakistiscope disc, entitled Running rats, created by Thomas Mann Baynes in 1833.

Illustration credit: Thomas Mann Baynes; animated by Basile Morin


February 22

Lansdowne portrait

The Lansdowne portrait is an iconic life-size portrait of George Washington painted by Gilbert Stuart in 1796. It depicts the 64-year-old president of the United States during his final year in office. The portrait was a gift to the former British prime minister William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, and spent more than 170 years in England. In 1968, it was loaned to the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., and purchased by the gallery in 2001. This copy of the Lansdowne portrait, also painted by Stuart, hangs in the East Room of the White House; it was rescued by First Lady Dolley Madison during the Burning of Washington in 1814.

Painting credit: Gilbert Stuart

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February 21

Tule elk

The tule elk (Cervus canadensis nannodes) is a subspecies of elk found only in California, seen here at Tomales Point in Point Reyes National Seashore. When Europeans arrived in the area, an estimated 500,000 tule elk roamed these regions, but the animals were thought to have been hunted to extinction by 1870. A single pair was discovered on the ranch of the cattle baron Henry Miller in 1874. He ordered his men to protect them, and is credited with the survival of the subspecies. As of 2019, the total Californian population is estimated to be 5,700.

Photograph credit: Frank Schulenburg


February 20

Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American landscape photographer and environmentalist, known for his black-and-white images of the American West. As a child, he visited Yosemite National Park with his family and was given his first camera. He was later tasked by the United States Department of the Interior to take photographs of national parks. For this work, and for his persistent advocacy, which helped expand the National Park system, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980.

Photograph credit: J. Malcolm Greany


February 19

Planthopper

Planthoppers are insects in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha. This photograph shows three adult Phromnia rosea planthoppers on a stem, with three nymphs underneath; the adults fold their wings in a tent-like fashion, while the nymphs are clad in a dense tangle of white wax threads. Both the adults and the nymphs feed by sucking sap from the host plant.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


February 18

The Barber of Seville

The Barber of Seville is an opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini. The plot revolves around the clever and enterprising character Figaro, the titular barber. This 1830 lithograph by Alexandre-Évariste Fragonard depicts the storm scene near the end of the opera's second act.

Lithograph credit: Alexandre-Évariste Fragonard; restored by Adam Cuerden


February 17

Helleborus orientalis

Helleborus orientalis, the Lenten rose, is a species of hellebore in the buttercup family, native to Greece and Turkey. German planters began breeding the species in the mid-19th century, but it fell out of favour as a garden plant in the 1920s. Interest was revived in the 1960s by Helen Ballard, who bred many new varieties. Cultivars have plain or spotted flowers, which can be white, green, pink, maroon or purple.

Photograph credit: Dominicus Johannes Bergsma


February 16

Rosalind Pitt-Rivers

Rosalind Pitt-Rivers (4 March 1907 – 14 January 1990) was a British biochemist, whose research focused mainly on the thyroid gland. In 1954, she was elected a fellow of the Royal Society. She was made a fellow of Bedford College, London, in 1973, an honorary fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine in 1983, and an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in 1986.

Photograph credit: National Institute for Medical Research; restored by Adam Cuerden


February 15

Wat Xieng Thong

Wat Xieng Thong is a Buddhist temple on the northern tip of the peninsula of Luang Prabang, Laos. Built between 1559 and 1560 by King Setthathirath, it is one of the most important Lao monasteries, and remains a significant monument to the spirit of religion, royalty and traditional art. The temple was spared damage during the sacking of the city in 1887, because the Black Flag leader, Đèo Văn Trị, had studied there as a monk in his early life and used it as his headquarters.

Photograph credit: Basile Morin


February 14

Jupiter and Io

Jupiter and Io is an oil-on-canvas painting by the Italian High Renaissance artist Antonio da Correggio. The scene is inspired by Ovid's classic Metamorphoses and depicts the mythological tale of the god Jupiter seducing the nymph Io. Jupiter's consort was Juno, but he was often tempted by other women and took on various disguises to cover his activities, variously taking the form of a swan or a bull, and here enveloping himself in a dark cloud. He is depicted embracing Io, his face barely visible above hers, and she is pulling Jupiter's vague, smoky hand towards herself with barely contained sensuality. The painting hangs in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, Austria.

Painting credit: Antonio da Correggio


February 13

White-throated kingfisher

The white-throated kingfisher (Halcyon smyrnensis) is a tree kingfisher, widely distributed in Asia from the Sinai Peninsula east through the Indian subcontinent to the Philippines. Seen here in the Singapore Botanic Gardens, it perches conspicuously on wires or other exposed perches within its territory, and is a frequent sight in southern Asia. This species mainly hunts large crustaceans, insects, earthworms, rodents, snakes, fish and frogs; it bathes in water but rarely drinks.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


February 12

Alice Roosevelt Longworth

Alice Roosevelt Longworth (February 12, 1884 – February 20, 1980) was an American writer and prominent socialite, the only child of U.S. president Theodore Roosevelt and his first wife Alice Hathaway Lee Roosevelt. Nicknamed "Princess Alice", she led an unconventional and controversial life. She was photographed here by Frances Benjamin Johnston in 1903.

Photograph credit: Frances Benjamin Johnston; restored by Adam Cuerden


February 11

Obverse and reverse of a 1626 Duchy of Parma two-doppie gold coin

The doubloon was a Spanish gold coin worth two escudos or 32 reales weighing 6.867 grams (0.221 troy ounces), introduced in 1537. It became the model for several other gold coins issued in Europe, including this 1626 two-doppie gold coin issued in Piacenza in northern Italy by the Duchy of Parma, depicting Odoardo Farnese, Duke of Parma, on the obverse. The coin is part of the National Numismatic Collection at the National Museum of American History.

Coin design credit: Duchy of Parma


February 10

Cross-sectional diagram of a chicken egg

Bird eggs are laid by females and incubated for a variable duration depending on the species. This diagram shows a cross-section of a chicken egg on its ninth day of incubation. The embryo is surrounded by the amnion, a membrane that fills with amniotic fluid and cushions it against shock; the allantois helps the embryo obtain oxygen and handles metabolic waste; the vitellus, or yolk, is the nutrient-bearing portion of the egg, containing most of its fat, minerals, and many of its proteins and blood vessels; the chorion forms the amniotic sac and encloses the other structures; the albumen protects the yolk and embryo and provides additional nutrients; the porous shell allows oxygen to enter while keeping unwanted fluids and contaminants out.

Diagram credit: KDS4444


February 9

William Henry Harrison

William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military officer and politician who served as the ninth president of the United States in 1841. He died of typhoid, pneumonia or paratyphoid fever 31 days into his term, becoming the first president to die in office. His death sparked a brief constitutional crisis regarding succession to the presidency. Vice President John Tyler claimed a constitutional mandate to become the new president and took the presidential oath of office, setting an important precedent for an orderly transfer of the presidency and its full powers when the previous president fails to complete the elected term.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


February 8

Rudra Mahalaya Temple

The Rudra Mahalaya Temple is an ancient temple complex at Siddhpur in the Patan district of Gujarat, India. The temple was completed in 1140 by Jayasimha Siddharaja, but in 1296, Alauddin Khalji sent an army under Ulugh Khan and Nusrat Khan, who dismantled the structure. In 1414 or 1415, the temple was further destroyed and the western part was converted into a congregational mosque by Muslim ruler Ahmad Shah I of the Muzaffarid dynasty. Apart from the mosque, the surviving fragments consist of two porches, a torana (ornamental gateway) and a few pillars.

Photograph credit: Bourne & Shepherd; retouched by Yann Forget


February 7

Cynthia Woodhead

Cynthia Woodhead (born February 7, 1964) is an American former competitive swimmer, world champion, Olympic medalist, and former world-record holder. At the age of fourteen, she won three gold medals at the 1978 World Aquatics Championships, and set seven world records during her career.

Photograph credit: Koen Suyk; restored by Adam Cuerden


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